MIXED BY IliasRo

MIXED BY IliasRo


 

TECHNO & TECHNO INDUSTRIAL


Techno is a form of electronic dance music that was developed in Detroit, Michigan, during the mid to late 1980s. ...The initial take on techno arose from the melding of various African American styles such as Chicago house, funk, electro, and electric jazz with Eurocentric synthesizer-based music.
Influenced by Kraftwerk’s Teutonic electro-pop and Alvin Toffler’s concept of “techno rebels,” a clique of deejay-producers—Derrick May, Juan Atkins, and Kevin Saunderson—began drawing attention to their innovative music in 1985. Crossing the Atlantic as an adjunct to Chicago house music, their early tracks—Rhythm Is Rhythm's “Strings of Life,” Model 500’s “No UFOs,” and Inner City’s “Good Life”—incited pandemonium on Europe’s dance floors. Unlike house, Detroit techno was primarily all-instrumental, and its beats were more complex than the disco-derived, four-to-the-floor kick-drum that underpinned house..

As the Detroit sound became a mainstay of the European rave scene (the neo-psychedelic subculture based around ecstasy-fueled all-night dance parties), white producers took the music in a harder-edged direction, replacing its dreamy elegance with aggressive riffs and druggy sample textures. Pioneered by Joey Beltram from New York City,

Belgian artists such as 80 Aum and Human Resource, and second-wave Detroit labels Underground Resistance and +8, this new brand of techno was called hardcore, signifying both its militant attitude and ecstasy-driven hedonism. Meanwhile, British styles such as the minimalist bleep-and-bass and breakbeat hardcore were bringing hip-hop influences into the mix.

By the mid-1990s, techno had fragmented into myriad subgenres, the most important being trance (characterized by metronomic beats and cosmic melodies),

Electronica (atmospheric experimentalism designed for album-length home listening), jungle (based around sped-up hip-hop breakbeats and floor-quaking reggae bass), and gabba (an ultrafast furor closer to heavy metal than dance music).

Although purist connoisseurs pined for the lighter touch of the Detroit originators and their inheritors Carl Craig and Jeff Mills, a rowdy, rock-and-roll mutant of techno invaded the American mainstream in 1997, with the success of albums by the Prodigy and the Chemical Brothers.


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